Compromise expected on cockpit guns

flydog

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Compromise expected on cockpit guns

Pilots must show proficiency like that of air marshals

June 19, 2002 Posted: 1:08 PM EDT (1708 GMT)

From Patty Davis
CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A House panel is poised to approve a bill Wednesday that would allow commercial jetliner pilots to carry guns in cockpits.

Republicans and Democrats on the House Transportation Aviation Subcommittee reached a compromise Tuesday night on the measure, which authorizes a two-year test program involving as many as 1,400 commercial airline pilots.

The subcommittee is expected to vote on the measure Wednesday afternoon.

The two-year period would begin only after 250 pilots had been deputized as federal flight deck officers allowed to carry firearms.

After two years, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) would be required to report to Congress. The TSA could then decide to continue, terminate or expand the pilot gun program.

As part of the compromise, flight attendants would get separate self-defense training.

"We have the votes to pass the House," said Gary Burns, a spokesman for the aviation subcommittee chairman, Rep. John Mica, Republican of Florida.

Burns said the compromise is not only intended to get House Democrats on board, but also to overcome strong opposition from some Senate Democrats.

Under the House bill, pilots must undergo training and demonstrate proficiency with firearms comparable with that of federal air marshals. The TSA would decide what type of guns and ammunition pilots would use and where the guns would be stored.

The Transportation Security Administration opposes guns in the cockpit. But it's studying whether to allow pilots to have stun guns or "Tasers." Currently, the TSA is the final arbiter of the issue.

The bill in the House and one in the Senate would take away the TSA's authority to decide the issue and give it to Congress.
 

Marmaduke McPug

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Okay…


But would these standards be the initial Air Marshal standards or the “relaxed” welfare to work standards the TSA announced the day after they told the world our Airline pilots would never be armed with anything beyond a crash axe or maybe a stun gun?

Inquiring minds want to know.



Not belittling the Air Marshals at all just pointing out political irrationality.

Personally who would you want, an Air Marshal who shot and qualified on the original course or the newly relaxed standards?

The only problem we have in this country with security and public safety is the politicians, they are the biggest obstacles to an effective plan, they suffer from what has been described as paralysis thru analysis.


Mike
 

cessna_driver2

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Everyone has their opinions on guns on the flight deck. It just makes me nervous. If these people can pay cash for training. They can spend a few extra hundred for a kevlar vest. Then we will be right back where we started only that everyone is armed except the passengers.

I know why don't the put a gun under the seat of every passenger as well. but only keep one or two loaded and only tell the flight crew which is loaded. That way if one person starts to become a problem he has the potental of facing all 200+ guns
 

lancair1

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cessna driver,
Unless the hijacker has a solid iron plate strapped to his chest, he will still be stopped by the impact of the bullet. I can't show some physics formula to display transfer of energy, but I've seen the transfer itself. Sort of like being hit in the chest by Barry Bonds' baseball bat.


In my opinion, this legislation will have no greater detering effect than the air marhalls. I just can't imagine that a hijacker would be afraid... His odds of unprotected vs. protected cockpits is certainly in his favor.

On the other hand, the "test" will likely display that pilots who control $40M aircraft are also capable of controlling a handgun.
 

Marmaduke McPug

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Earlier today I was watching the Communist News Network, aka CNN and they had this guy on who was promoting himself to be and I quote, “Air Transportation Expert”.

Well he was wailing on and on about just of dangerous a gun in the cockpit can be especially if discharged and it hits the panel or punches out a window, you know the Hollywood explosive decompression theory.

My only question to this is, what about the Air Marshals gun?

He was also asked by some news babe about the pilots and what if one had a criminal background, would this not create an illegal situation with him or her having access to a gun.

I almost puked.

I guess we’re now the bad guys.

Excuse me while I go and plot my next evil deed…uh, I mean flight plan.

Mike
:mad:
 

dav8or

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I want to know what I'm going to do with my gun when I fly those legs to Canada?
 

ifly4food

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To Muc
Marmaduke McPug said:
Earlier today I was watching the Communist News Network, aka CNN and they had this guy on who was promoting himself to be and I quote, “Air Transportation Expert”.

Well he was wailing on and on about just of dangerous a gun in the cockpit can be especially if discharged and it hits the panel or punches out a window, you know the Hollywood explosive decompression theory.

He was also asked by some news babe about the pilots and what if one had a criminal background, would this not create an illegal situation with him or her having access to a gun.

I almost puked.

I guess we’re now the bad guys.
I hope every airline pilot writes CNN and tells them how much we appreciate their "accurate, non-sensationalist, and fair" reporting on aviation matters. Maybe even write airline management... perhaps CNN would get the message if the "CNN Airport Network" and Delta's "CNN Inflight" went to FOX news.
 
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