Climb Gradient

Dep676

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Where do I find out about climb gradient? Is it in part 25 of the FAR? My FAR/AIM doesn't have part 25 or at least I can't find it. I did a search on the forum and found some stuff but I would like to see more.

Thanks
 

spike

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Try the AIM

There is some climb gradient info in the aim under Departures.
It discusses the standard IFR departure climb gradient, diverse departure criteria, etc... it is a good start.
 

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Shem Malmquist
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All the regs are available off the FAA web site.
 

bigsky

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Im away from a book at the time but but I believe that there are different gradients listed for 1st, 2nd and final climb gradients in the event of an engine failure for 2,3. and 4 engine aircraft. I believe that would be under part 25 but I may have seen it under part 121.
As far as a basic climb gradient like crosssing ry at 35 feet and climbing 200 feet per mile unless specified otherwise-- I believe that may be in the terps.( kind of a W.A.G.)
 

Chairman

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Climb Gradients under part 25 only specify that the airplane can not take off at a weight that would allow it to climb at less that 1.6% Net.

Climb Gradients for departure procedures are designed around the Terps criteria where you will find the 200ft/nm or 3.3 standard. Go to Terps.com for all the info you will need on how departures are designed.
 

flx757

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Chairman said:
Climb Gradients under part 25 only specify that the airplane can not take off at a weight that would allow it to climb at less that 1.6% Net.
It's not quite that simplistic. You will find much more information on required climb gradients in Part 25.

25.111 deals with takeoff path, 25.115--takeoff flight path, 25.119--landing climb: all engines operating, and 25.121--climb--one engine inoperative.

The gradients required differ for 2, 3 and 4-engine airplanes.
 

SheGaveMeClap

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Hey Dep, don't forget you need to figure climb gradients as well, they'll ask that. How do you turn feet per mile into a percent climb gradient, and turn a percent into feet per mile. Remember, any questions, just ask!! They'll just ask about the climb gradient in and out of Aspen. They might not get into it as much with you if you don't have any prior jet experience.
 

luv2fly

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Climb gradient information is in the front section of your Jepps. It will give rate of climb to accomplish the gradient % you need (ie. departure in mtn. terrain)
 
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