Check Airman

want2fly

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Nov 30, 2001
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What's involved with becoming and being a check airman? Are you required to have a CFI? Is it really that much more work than being a regular line captain? For those of you that are check airman, are you glad you did it? How much more money do you make doing this? Thanks
 

cpritchie5

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You don't need a CFI to be a check airman. Much of it is politics i.e the cheif pilot can ask you to be one. They then interview with the chief pilot, then with the fleet training managers thrn get approved from higher up. AA has two types X and L types. X types spend a month in flight stadards where they fly the line. They do IOE's and line checks. then the next month they will be doing simulator training and if they are FAA designees they will conduct orals and checkrides. L types just do flight standards out of their base. They get paid a steady salary per month. Unfortun atly now many have gone back to line captains because of the reduction in training.
 

cl-65link

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I am a check airman for the airline I work for. At this airline all check airman do line checks and IOE. For those that live in the town where sim training is done they can also give sim instruction. However, do not confuse "check airman" with the APD or designated examiner at various airlines. At my company only an APD can give a airplane type checkride. These people serve at the convience of the FAA and our principle operations inspector(POI). Whenever I give a line check or conduct IOE I get paid time and half for this. We serve as representatives for the FAA at the airline because there is obviously no way the FAA could conduct all the checks and IOE that takes place in the 121 world.
 

Rick1128

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What the previous two gentlemen has said is true. Under Part 135 it is a little bit different. You don't have to be a CFI to be a check airman or instructor, but you must meet all the training requirements thereof. You must be knowledgeable of the aircraft, company manuals and procedures and regulations. I am not sure how it is under 121, but under 135, you must be approved by the company's Principle Operations Inspector. When approved, you will be issued a letter stating that, containing your authorizations and limitations. Plus a copy will be place in your pilot file.

It can be fun. You get to do things on a regular basis that you normally do just during annual training. It does tend to keep you sharp. The down side, more work and responsibility. More face time with the Feds. A lot more paperwork.
 
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