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Chalk's Cockpit Voice Recorder Inaudible...

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FN FAL

Freight Dawgs Rule
Joined
Dec 17, 2003
Posts
8,573
Was reading the news this afternoon and the feds said that the Chalk flight data recorder was inaudible. Does that mean that the pilots were dead before the wing came off or does it just mean that the pilots didn''t say anything for the length of the recording?

:eek:
 
Does that mean that the pilots were dead before the wing came off or does it just mean that the pilots didn''t say anything for the length of the recording?

huhh??? Yeah they were dead before take off. :erm:
 
I don't know where you are trying to go with this, but lets brush up on what the term inaudible means.

in·au·di·ble adj. Impossible to hear: an inaudible conversation.
 
How far back does a CVR go?

You're going to tell me there aint nothing on the whole CVR recording that aint audible?

Geeeze, tell me that it's all good up to the snap of the wing and I'll let what comes next be a given, but don't tell me that the whole tape is unusable.

If they are that falible, why requrire them?
 
Who knows. It's possible that maybe the area mic(s) were so old they weren't picking up voice-level sounds anymore.
 
I'm not sure whether this thread is serious or not, but to clarify, the CVR if the old analog style records 30 minutes onto a continuous loop tape. The new digital CVR's record 2 hours. This isn't the first accident where the box was intact but the tape had nothing on it. It is usually a wiring problem but can be a mic (there are 3 or 4: CAM, CA audio panel, FO audio panel, and PA/jumpseat). Could also be the tape/chip. The test function (a 121 first flight of the day item) doesn't always detect a failure but inspections at maintenace intervals should. The unavailabilty of replacement tapes and failures such as this one were a big part of the recent reg changes that mandate digital CVR's and beef up testing. The other reason was that some accidents have a longer "event phase" than 30 minutes, therefore the 2 hour requirement now. In this particular accident, the saving grace is that they have at least two videos of the impact sequence and some pretty strong physical evidence. A CVR would have still been useful and an FDR might have provided a clue if some event during takeoff (or a previous flight within 25 hours or so) was particularly stressful to the airframe/wing.
 
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