Before Sully there was Dardano at TACA in New Orleans

MCDU

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Whine Lover

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Don't forget Capt. Piche and Crew:


"On August 24, 2001, Capt. Robert Piche (a pilot for the Canadian charter airline Air Transat) did something that I would have (until now) flatly told you was impossible had it been proposed.
Air Transat Flight 236, an Airbus A330 twin-engined aircraft with 304 aboard, was in transit from Toronto to Lisbon on August 21st. The A330's ETOPS rating is 120 minutes. Over the Atlantic, the crew received a warning that the right engine had developed a fuel leak. It was shut down. At this point, the aircraft is theoretically able to fly on the remaining engine for the duration of its ETOPS (120 minutes); accordingly, the aircrew declared that they were diverting to Lajes airfield in the Azores islands, approximately 150 nm away.
There were further problems, however. The fuel leak was caused by a pipe breaking inside one of the Rolls-Royce Trent 700 series engines. This leak, which was caused by a low-pressure fuel line coming into contact with one of the hydraulic lines, ended up draining the entire fuel system, perhaps due to an improperly-acting weight and balance controller or valve. In any case, thirteen minutes after the right engine was shut down, the left engine experienced flame out from fuel starvation.
At the time this happened, the airplane was 85 nm north of its destination (and the nearest airfield), flying at 34,500 feet. When the second engine failed, generated electrical power was lost; hydraulics apparently continued to function, driven by the 'windmilling' fans of the left engine and their associated generator.
Capt. Piche and crew managed to fly the unpowered jetliner for 85 (some sources say 100+) nautical miles, and landed it at Lajes airfield on Terceira island. The landing blew eight of the ten tires on the airplane; however, it remained otherwise intact, and evacuation was complete within 90 seconds. Less than a dozen people were injured, all minor; most of those occurred during the evacuation."
 

Full of LUV

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What????

Don't forget Capt. Piche and Crew:


"On August 24, 2001, Capt. Robert Piche (a pilot for the Canadian charter airline Air Transat) did something that I would have (until now) flatly told you was impossible had it been proposed.
Air Transat Flight 236, an Airbus A330 twin-engined aircraft with 304 aboard, was in transit from Toronto to Lisbon on August 21st. The A330's ETOPS rating is 120 minutes. Over the Atlantic, the crew received a warning that the right engine had developed a fuel leak. It was shut down. At this point, the aircraft is theoretically able to fly on the remaining engine for the duration of its ETOPS (120 minutes); accordingly, the aircrew declared that they were diverting to Lajes airfield in the Azores islands, approximately 150 nm away.
There were further problems, however. The fuel leak was caused by a pipe breaking inside one of the Rolls-Royce Trent 700 series engines. This leak, which was caused by a low-pressure fuel line coming into contact with one of the hydraulic lines, ended up draining the entire fuel system, perhaps due to an improperly-acting weight and balance controller or valve. In any case, thirteen minutes after the right engine was shut down, the left engine experienced flame out from fuel starvation.
At the time this happened, the airplane was 85 nm north of its destination (and the nearest airfield), flying at 34,500 feet. When the second engine failed, generated electrical power was lost; hydraulics apparently continued to function, driven by the 'windmilling' fans of the left engine and their associated generator.
Capt. Piche and crew managed to fly the unpowered jetliner for 85 (some sources say 100+) nautical miles, and landed it at Lajes airfield on Terceira island. The landing blew eight of the ten tires on the airplane; however, it remained otherwise intact, and evacuation was complete within 90 seconds. Less than a dozen people were injured, all minor; most of those occurred during the evacuation."
According to the National Geographic special on this incident "seconds from disaster" at the end they say the Captain was sentenced to a year in PRISON for "criminal negligence" after the investigation revealed that the crew did not complete any fuel logs and should have noticed the fuel leak before even going feet wet in Canada. The copilot was supposedly stripped of his commercial pilots liscense and never allowed to fly for profit again in Canada.

No doubt the best saving of a negligent situation, but true professionals wouldn't have been in that situation in the first place.
 

General Lee

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Is that how TACA got it's nickname--Take A Chance Airlines?


Bye Bye--General Lee
 

glasspilot1

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the crew did not complete any fuel logs and should have noticed the fuel leak before even going feet wet in Canada.
To show all how important fuel logs are here's a story. In the early nineties (I think) there was a TWA L1011 going HNL to LAX or SFO. A ways east of HNL the engineer noticed much greater than normal fuel burn. The Capt ordered a turn around and they landed on fumes.
 

Colonel Savage

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TRIPLE Flameout!!

Don't Forget this one!

"At 08:56 Eastern Air Lines Flight 855 departed Miami International Airport en route to Nassau, Bahamas. About 09:15:15, while descending through 15,000 feet, the low oil pressure light on the TriStar's No. 2 engine illuminated. The No. 2 engine was shut down, and the captain decided to return to Miami to land. The airplane was cleared to Miami and began a climb to FL 200. While en route to Miami, the low oil pressure lights for engines Nos. 1 and 3 illuminated. At 09:28:20, while at 16,000 feet, the No. 3 engine flamed out. At 09:33:20, the No. 1 engine flamed out while the flightcrew was attempting to restart the No. 2 engine. The airplane descended without power from about 13,000 feet to about 4,000 feet, at which time the No. 2 engine was restarted. The airplane made a one-engine landing at Miami International Airport at 09:46. There were no injuries to the occupants."

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the omission of all the O-ring seals on the master chip detector assemblies leading to the loss of lubrication and damage to the airplane's three engines as a result of the failure of mechanics to follow the established and proper procedures for the installation of master chip detectors in the engine lubrication system, the repeated failure of supervisory personnel to require mechanics to comply strictly with the prescribed installation procedures, and the failure of Eastern Air Lines management to assess adequately the significance of similar previous occurrences and to act effectively to institute corrective action.
Contributing to the cause of the accident was the failure of Federal Aviation Administration maintenance inspectors to assess the significance of the incidents involving master chip detectors and to take effective surveillance and enforcement measures to prevent the recurrence of the incidents."
 

JetMonkey

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I remember the TACA one too. Anybody know the reason they lost both engines?
 

Tristar

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To show all how important fuel logs are here's a story. In the early nineties (I think) there was a TWA L1011 going HNL to LAX or SFO. A ways east of HNL the engineer noticed much greater than normal fuel burn. The Capt ordered a turn around and they landed on fumes.
Similar story: About six years ago ATA had a engine fuel line break on a 757 enroute to PHNL (past ETP) - the crew caught the abnormality through use of proper procedures, performed a precautionary shutdown on the engine (per the manual), diverted to Kahalui, landed with just a bit more than fumes. Again, had they been asleep at the switch - they would have become a glider and quite possibly had to ditch.

Also, I thought Delta was Don't Ever Land There Again (or Doesn't Everyone get Lost over The Atlantic?)!
 
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Colonel Savage

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Extremely heavy rain as I recall
Was the incident that brought about the use of continous ignition on the CFM-56 engine in moderate or heavier rain in flight.
 

GuppyWN

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Heavy rain? I thought he flew through hail and shelled both motors.

Gup
 

skidbuggy

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Capt. Robert Piche of Air Transat....

wasn't he a convicted felon in the state of Georgia for running drugs and spent time in the joint down there?
 

Colonel Savage

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Heavy rain? I thought he flew through hail and shelled both motors.

Gup
Here ya go, Gup:


Narrative:
During descent from FL350 for an IFR arrival to New Orleans, the flight crew noted green and yellow returns on the weather radar with some isolated red cells, left and right of the intended flight path. Before entering clouds at FL300, the captain selected continuous engine ignition and activated engine anti-ice systems. The crew selected a route between the 2 cells, displayed as red on the weather radar. Heavy rain, hail and turbulence were encountered. At about FL165, both engines flamed out. The APU was started and aircraft electrical power was restored while descending through abou FL106. Attempts to wind-mill restart the engines were unsuccessful. Both engines lit-off by using starters, but neither would accelerate to idle; advancing the thrust levers increased the EGT beyond limits. The engines were shut down to avoid a catastrophic failure. An emergency landing was made on a 6060 feetx120 feet grass strip next to a levee without further damage to the aircraft.
Investigation revealed that the aircraft encountered a level 4 thunderstorm but engines flamed out, though they had met the FAA specs for water ingestion. The aircraft had minor hail damage; the #2 engine was damaged from overtemperature.
The 737 took off from the field on June 6.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "A double engine flameout due to water ingestion which occurred as a result of an inflight encounter with an area of very heavy rain and hail. A contributing cause of the incident was the inadequate design of the engines and the FAA water ingestion certification standards which did not reflect the waterfall rates that can be expected in moderate or higher intensity thunderstorms."

Follow-up / safety actions:
After the incident, OMB 88-5 and AD 6-14-88 were issued to require minimum rpm of 45% and to restrict the use of autothrust in moderate/heavy precipitation; engine modification was provided for increased capacity of water ingestion.
Despite of this AD, a Continental Airlines B737-300 suffered a nr.1 engine flameout while descending through heavy precipitation with throttles at flight idle, July 26, 1988. The co-pilot warned the captain of the fact that idle descent was contrary to recently published procedures, but idle descent was continued.
 

PHXFLYR

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Heavy rain? I thought he flew through hail and shelled both motors.

Gup

No. That was a Southern Airways DC-9 going into ATL .Happened back in 1977 and made a forced landing on a road in New Hope GA if I remember correctly.

PHXFLYR:cool:
 
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