Article on JB292 and pilots in general

Photoflight

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Editorial: Pilots/There's more than meets the eye
September 23, 2005 ED0923A



You've seen them trudging through airports, pulling their little black cases along, lost in thought, a bit aloof from the hustle and bustle of the terminal, sometimes seeming bored, unremarkable really, except for their uniforms. These are the pilots and first officers who guide airliners with hundreds of passengers aboard on flights short and long. Many who are unfamiliar with aviation beyond being passengers have come to regard them as little more than glorified button pushers, such is the electronic complexity of modern aircraft.

But no more; Wednesday night a JetBlue captain named Scott Burke demonstrated, on live, prime-time television, skill and psychological toughness of awesome proportions. Never again will those who saw it underestimate the virtuosity required to be a pilot or first officer of a commercial jet.

Most people know the story by now: A JetBlue airliner took off from Bob Hope Airport in Burbank, Calif., for John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. Shortly after takeoff, the crew determined that the nose landing gear had failed to retract and was turned sideways.

What followed were three tense hours as the airliner flew at low altitudes and slow speeds, with flaps down, to burn off maximum fuel. Finally, Burke and his first officer brought the plane in for landing at Los Angeles International.

They came in as slowly as possible, with the nose of the plane somewhat more elevated than normal. The back wheels touched down, and Burke kept the nose in the air for as long as possible while they slowed the plane. Finally and ever so gently, they lowered the nose to the runway.

First the tires caught fire; then the aluminum struts holding the nose gear emitted a shower of sparks, but that was all. The plane came to a safe stop without even breaking the struts. And throughout this whole maneuver, the plane never strayed more than six inches from the center line of the runway.

For those watching who were unfamiliar with the rigors of piloting large planes, it was as if a curtain lifted, and they were given an unusual glimpse behind the scene. And they came to realize these folks really are exceptionally skilled and well trained.

Some people on the plane said Burke was so calm they did not realize the difficulty they were in until they tuned in to CNN on their seat-back television screens. Others monitoring talk between the plane and the ground commented on the same thing.

One person said that when Burke finally came off the plane, he had a big grin on his face and apologized for being a few inches off the center line when the plane finally came to a rest. He deserved that bit of bravado.

Burke's performance was a powerful reminder: Never underestimate what it takes to work in the very front of the plane behind closed and locked doors. Like cops who spend boring shifts patrolling in squad cars, like firefighters who wait endless hours in station houses, airline pilots have a critical set of skills you can't see, but which are available when needed to help keep you safe.
 

flatspin7

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:eek: OMG--- An article that make Pilots look good... Thats incredible... passengers should be force to read it before getting on the airplane.
 

pilotyip

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Great Job

No intent to degrade Scot for his doing a great job He demonstrated he is being skilled and well trained. But it could be that Scott does not have a college degree, JB hires a good number of pilots without degrees, because they know a college degree has nothing to do with being skilled and well trained. Like SWA they do not let the absence of a college degree stand in the way of hiring the right person. The degree has nothing to do with skill. Read the tales of the B-17 pilots, high school grads, over Germany in WWII. They brought back airplanes that were scrap metal and safely got their crews on the ground.
 
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learflyer

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It was nice just to see them use the term "pilots" instead of "the pilot".
 

cforst513

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don't detract from the original post by hijacking this thread.

i really enjoyed that story and read it with a smile on my face.
 

pilotyip

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Sorry

I apologize for perceived hi-jacking, but just reinforcing a proven fact for the "Must have a degree" crowd. A degree has nothing to do with a pilot's skill. Again not to detract from Scott's performance, it is most likely any JB crew would have obtained the same results, any UAL crew, NWA crew, etc. All professional pilots are skilled and well trained.
 
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English

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No hijacking, yip, please.
 

pilotyip

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OK English no more on this thread, how is my spelling doing?
 

AA717driver

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The pax don't need to read it as much as the airline senior management--EVERY FREAKIN' DAY THAT THEY RUN AN AIRLINE! :mad:

There, I'm better now.TC

P.S.--Hey, Roy E.! Let's see some donught-swilling pogue like you do what those guys did. Yeah, you think YOU earn your pay... :rolleyes:
 

Flying Illini

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Where was that editorial found at?

Great editorial...maybe ALPA or whatever union represents you (I understand there is more than one?) should take out a full page ad in every major national newspaper in the country and reprint the editorial for all to read.

Had the crew still done the same great job, but the nose gear failed to hold and the aircraft ground to a halt on the centerline, would this article still have been written or would the crew's actions be percieved as a failure and written up as "JetBlue Flt. 292 Crashes!"?
 
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PCL_128

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pilotyip said:
But it could be that Scott does not have a college degree, JB hires a good number of pilots without degrees, because they know a college degree has nothing to do with being skilled and well trained.

I've gotta hand it to you yip, you're definitely persistent. :D
 

Photoflight

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I copied it from JC.com. I believe it was in the minneapolis paper.
 

AdlerDriver

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PCL_128 said:
I've gotta hand it to you yip, you're definitely persistent. :D

And, quite obviously, extremely self-conscious of his deficient education. ;)
 

Resume Writer

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Yip, I have to say, I cannot believe the only thing you could come up with out of this editorial was whether Scott had a college degree or not! He did an awesome job landing that airplane, he deserves to be lauded, along with his First Officer, and the cabin crew. Please, let go of the degree thing; it really is getting silly.
 

cforst513

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AdlerDriver said:
And, quite obviously, extremely self-conscious of his deficient education. ;)
actually, he has a degree, and he might even have a masters, i can't remember. dunno why he ALWAYS tries talking peeps outta getting an education and bettering themselves as a person.:confused: :confused: :confused:
 

cforst513

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Metro752 said:
College can SURE SUCK sometimes.
enjoy it while you can. i'm only 4 months or so removed from college and i wish that i was back there.... :( they actually make you pay for bills in the real world!!! those jerks.
 
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