Any chance for corporate?

Spoolup

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Dec 23, 2001
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What would the chance that someone with 2000/300 getting a job corporate?
 

banned username 2

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I think you have a chance... every companies minimums are different...

Don't limit yourself just to seeking part 91 Corporate operators... also look into Part 135 Charter operators, you would definately have a chance with them....

Either way, your hours are in the ball park.... you can't win if you don't play!

Good Luck!
 

2000flyer

EASY FLYER
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I got my first corporate job with 1000TT/600ME. Even in todays market, many corporate jobs are word of mouth and who you know. However, with that being said, I believe there are an equal number of jobs out there that hire qualified men and women whom they've never met.

I also believe that in finding a corporate job, networking is a key to their front door. Every FBO you visit, make a point to meet the corporate pilots who are there. Even if it's just idle chat, show them your interest in corporate aviation and your desire to find a corporate flying position. You just never know if they are hiring or have a buddy who is hiring.

Also, Falcon Capt is right on with the 135 operators. With your time you should have an excellent chance at getting on with a reputable operator.

Regards,
2000Flyer
 

flydog

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Nov 28, 2001
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2500+
My first Captain jet job came at 1800/500 with a 135 operator. Corporate jobs usually seek much higher times but there are some that dont.

The driving force right now is insurance rates. Many 135 operators who have been in business for many years and have large fleets can put Captains in their airplanes with just 1500tt and no jet PIC time as long as they are Simuflite or Flight Safety current. I have spoken with corporate operators whose insurance required Captains to have 5,000 TT and 3,000 PIC jet.
 

flywithruss

Rocky Top!
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Nov 26, 2001
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Anything's possible!

I'll second the previous posts. I had regional airline tunnel vision for a long time, then 9/11 happened. Re-evaluated my priorities, and corporate is probably a better fit for me. Then (at 1000/180!), a King Air job (Part 91 corporate) fell in to my lap, courtesy of the "network" we all know so well.

The other posts are right on. Talk to people, cultivate every contact you can, and never throw away a business card. At your experience level, it won't take too long.

Tailwinds ...

R
 

Huck

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Here's how I used to do it-

1. Get some business cards. Get a good pager or cell phone with voice mail. Become very available.

2. EVERY DAY that you're not flying, put on a suit and bang on hangar doors. I made it a point to visit every big hangar in Birmingham at least once a month. Every chief pilot knew me on sight.

3. The bigger companies have a secretary or dispatcher who is in charge of calling part-time/fill in pilots. Once I knew who they were, I would call them EVERY day - at whatever time of day they worked on the next day's schedule. Make them your best friends.

Good luck! I've been Part 121 for 8 years, and I'm putting some heavy thought into going back to corporate. As I recall, I got alot more respect back then... never once had to have the soles of my feet patted down ....
 

CL60

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Feb 10, 2002
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Get one foot in the door

Spoolup,

Corporate is a great lifestyle if you get with the right company. You have a good chance of getting started if you have the right personality and are willing to move wherever you have to. Pay your dues and gain experience and a solid rep in the business. That will get you in most doors. Like the others stated, network, network, network... You can get lucky with persistence and being in the right place at the right time but networking will get you there quicker.

There are many corporations out there who operate smaller jets and t-props at the entry level. Most of them don't pay top dollar and are basically training grounds for beginners in our business. You need to find one of them and get your corporate, high altitude, and turbine experience. Target 500 series Citation operators and/or t-prop operators for your first job.

Some advice, don't try to go too fast. I've seen more than one yahooo fall into a good corp job too early in their career and then blow it because they "oversold" themselves. E.g., once, a friend was checking out a very junior bird man in a Challenger... right after takeoff they were issued a re-route... the newbie totally shut down. The checklist was all but forgotten, the sop's were a distant memory, etc... He also did some other stupid things that he probably would not normally do if he had taken the time to gain some valuable experience. Issuing incorrect fuel orders, (big mistake!!!), improper phraseology on the radios, accidentally shutting down the APU at engine start!, turning the interior lights to bright just before a night touchdown. (That impressed the captain!).

I got my first real corp flying gig at 2500 hours but times were much tougher back then. Few flying jobs and lots of pilots.

Never give up.

Good luck,
 

na265

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Nov 27, 2001
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Great advice from CL60. Especially about going to fast. Slow down and learn your equipment before you do something really wrong.
 

Spoolup

Active member
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Dec 23, 2001
Posts
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Total Time
5000
Thank you for the replies, they have definately been helpful and encouraging.
I've been looking around on Charter networks for companies and have been sending my resumes out lately.
Time will tell....
 
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