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Am I eligible?

Hung Start

Just the cleanup guy
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Sep 12, 2004
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Question for you folks that do this all the time.

I own and operate a military warbird. One of the types that were non-certified by the FAA, so I operate it on a "experimental" type certificate. Obviously, I didn't build it, North American did. So, here is my question:

Can I get a repairman's certificate that would allow me to sign off any work I do, such as the condition inspection. I have gotten different views, some say yes, some say no. And different FSDO inspections have given me the same answers, altho none while wearing the "official" hat.
I pretty much have maintained the aircraft for 6 years, just get someone to come and inspect the opened up aircraft, but have recently moved. I am very knowledgeable on the plane. So what are my prospects of obtainng the official desigation?
All opinions/suggestions appreciated.
 

EagleRJ

Are we there yet?
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Nov 27, 2001
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The only situation I have heard of this being done is in the case of someone who drags a mangled wreck out of the jungle and "restores" it back to flying condition. The project may officially be a restoration, but nearly all of the aircraft is new, so the owner is assumed to have the same knowledge and background as someone who built a plane from scratch.
You can always try, but if your aircraft was anywhere near flyable when you acquired it, I would guess that the FAA would not issue a repairman's certificate.

If you are near a chapter of the Commemmorative Air Force or EAA Warbirds, you may be able to find someone who can do your inspections for a reasonable price. Many chapters have members who are IAs and are familiar with warbird maintenance, and they may be willing to help you with your plane.
 

erj-145mech

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You can only get a repairmans certificate if the aircraft is amateur built, experimental-amateur, and you built more than 51% of it. You plane is certificated as an experimental-exhibition, so no dice, sorry.
 

avbug

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The "repairman" certificate to which you refer is actually a manufacturers authorization. You're being recognized as the manufacturer of the airplane, and that certificate extends only so far as the specific airplane you built. It doesn't extend to any others. If you build the Hatfield Special, serial number #00001, then your repairman certificate enables you to repair the Hatfield Special, serial number #00001, only. If someone else builds the same airplane, your repairman certificate doesn't cover that.

In this case, you didn't build the airplane. You're not the manufacturer. You're obligated to comply with all approved data (manufacturer, otherwise), and depending upon the nature of the approval and any waivers, you may be required to use certificated mechanics to do the labor on part or all of the aircraft.

From your post, I get the sense that your motive for obtaining the repairman certificate is to save money. There's nothing wrong with that, but it begs the question...are you qualified to work on it? I'm not talking certification, but basic knowledge, training, and experience?

If so, then why not go ahead and work toward your mechanic certification and have legitimate credentials?
 

Hung Start

Just the cleanup guy
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Sep 12, 2004
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Thanks all, for the replies. Not the answer I had hoped for, but the one that I thought would be rendered. I guess I was hoping there was some hidden exemption out there, since the FAA seems to have an exemption for just about everything.

And Avbug,,, you certainly read my motives, these days saving a buck does not hurt (especialy when the old girl burns 55 gallons per hours at at LOW cruise).
I was not trying to bypass the very talented folks who have made this their living, sure do appreciate their knowledge. But,, a couple of things have been worrying me these days.
1) Getting harder and harder to find someone who has a good knowledge of old Wright radials. When I was up north I used an ex Navy guy, solid as Sears. But don't have that resource anymore.
2) Best I can tell, there is no "manufacturers data" that is valid. It is a old military aitcraft, manufacurer is no longer around. We have a kind of "network" that we all use, and there is a checklist that was developed by one of the regulars, and very well done. Just about anybody with brains uses that.
3) I am fortunate that I have the ability to go to an A&P school, as I'm sort of retired. But,, I do have a couple of friends that are Designated Mechanic Examiners, and both have lamented about the quality that seems to be coming out of the schools. And I wonder what I would gain (other than learning the correct paperwork), I have worked around aircraft for about 20 years. I owned an FBO and owned/operated over 40 aircraft in that time, and believe me, was working along with my DOM in the middle of the night when the frieght had to go. But, none of it was documented.
So, I guess I'm not trying to cheat the system, just want to maximize my time and continue to do what I enjoy.
Do appreciate you taking the time to reply. And, if you ever want a ride,,, just call!! :)
 

erj-145mech

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Hung Start, what do you have, a T-28? I have a bunch of Wright R-1820 and R-2600 experience from B-17, SBD, PB4Y and B-25 airplanes. I used to own a T-6G and ended up selling it when the prices went thru the roof.
 

Hung Start

Just the cleanup guy
Joined
Sep 12, 2004
Posts
701
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Sure is, a 1955 B model. Pretty much stock, although I put a HSI in the front cockpit and a Garmin GPS also. Certified IFR.

Thinking of geting rid of the old motor inverters, but the only thing they run now is the two horizons.
If you have any surplus engine tools ou might like topart with, I'd like to talk to ya!

I installed the Darton clean kit, what a dfference that made on the mess. I can park for weeks on end and come back and have a drop or two on the ground, not Lake Superior. And no real mess when starting.
Trulely a joy to fly, now if OPEC would just give me a break,,,,,
 
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