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Aerobatic Instruction Questions

hindsight2020

Yeah Buddy
Joined
Oct 14, 2004
Posts
235
Total Time
23:41Z
Hi folks,

I was browsing the web for information relating to aerobatics and found this:

http://www.flyeft.com/modular/ari.html

Now, in my quest to gather as much information as possible on aerobatics, I have come to realize that in the States, one is not required to be an Aerobatics Instructor (as no such certificate exists in the US nor one is required by the FAA) to perform aerobatic instruction. Furthermore, one doesn't even have to be a CFI to conduct aerobatics instruction.

Now, it is my interest to develop my aeronautical experience around aerobatics, and hopefully develop as financially solvent an aerobatic instruction operation as possible (be it self-employed or involved with an existing outfit).

Those were the primary reasons why I pursued my CFI tickets, and intend to pursue formal aerobatics training in the near future (hopefully military, as part of the training that one undergoes at UPT). I do not intend to self-start my own "do it for less in a 150, u pay I loop" operation in the backyard of my apt complex, as I understand the added responsibility of teaching somebody aerobatics, and do intend to walk before I run.

With all that in mind, I still wonder however, why is there no formal FAA certification required to instruct aerobatics in the States? Is it just a "cost-of-entry" economic contention that "gatekeeps" one's ability to enter this side of aviation? (Read: I'd make a great acro instructor, I just can't afford the Extra 300 :D) On that note, is it a "reputation" based affair (aka that guy flew the shuttle so you should go learn acro from him, etc etc), or do insurance companies also dictate and/or affect one's cost-benefit analysis in trying to enter the business and keep it on the black?

I'm pretty much convinced this is the side of aviation I'll probably pursue (whether it's financially solvent or not) and I was just trying to get some feedback about the points I've raised in my own head in the last couple of months and posted above.

Thanks guys.
 

jlowell

Member
Joined
Oct 11, 2005
Posts
15
Total Time
6
dunno....but I am planning on going here for instruction http://www.harveyrihn.com/index.html when I finally reach that point (I am early in my flight career) but it seems her track record pretty much speaks for itself and I have heard other pilots say they went there and really spoke well of the place. It is near me in Texas......I am sure there are plenty of qualified places.....that happens to be the one I uncovered. :eek:)

cheers, jim
 
Last edited:

PUNISHER

You got any tinfoil?
Joined
Sep 8, 2005
Posts
329
Total Time
4000+
jlowell said:
dunno....but I am planning on going here for instruction http://www.harveyrihn.com/index.html when I finally reach that point (I am early in my flight career) but it seems her track record pretty much speaks for itself and I have heard other pilots say they went there and really spoke well of the place. It is near me in Texas......I am sure there are plenty of qualified places.....that happens to be the one I uncovered. :eek:)

cheers, jim
Jim,
You won't be disapointed,
HR is great place to get some good acro instruction. I did the Sportsman program down in LaPorte about three years ago. Best $900 dollars I've ever spent. When you complete the course you should be able to fly a pretty good IAC Sportsman routine. I would recomend HR to anyone looking to get started or wanting to learn some advance stuff to.
 

agpilot34

Pipeline 56 Delta
Joined
Nov 27, 2004
Posts
364
Total Time
Plenty
Hindsight...

My first question would be "What are your credentials as far as aerobatics instruction is concerned"? Most people that are seeking this level of instruction are going to want the person giving the instruction to have a high level of skill, and lots of experience...ie, a background in competition aerobatics or instructing unusual attitude recovery techniques, and several years of experience. It's a bunch more than just going out and showing someone how to do a loop, roll, or spin. Most of the aerobatics instructors that I know of (the qualified ones, anyway) are at least a CFII, with several years of aerobatics experience, either through competition or airshow experience. As long as you get some good experience before you start trying to teach others about acro, you'll probably do alright. As far as your comment about not needing to be a CFI to give aerobatics instruction, I dont know whether I believe that one. How is someone going to sign off a log book without being a CFI? I know a sign off is not required, but there are people who want it. I've never seen ANYONE give aerobatics instruction that didnt hold at least a CFI, and usually a CFII. Someone would be crazy to take that level of instruction from a pilot that is not an experienced instructor. JMHO though!
 

nosehair

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 22, 2003
Posts
1,238
Total Time
24/7
agpilot34 said:
I've never seen ANYONE give aerobatics instruction that didnt holdat least a CFI.

Well, now, Aggie, slow down. Don't blow a fuse. There are still, maybe, a few of those old WW2 P-51 Drivers, 'n such, who didn't bother gettin' those FAA licenses...just took to civilian flying back in the day when paperwork didn't mean too much. A pilot's word was his bond...oops! Didn't man to digress that far back. Anyway, there can be, and are many good aerobatic pilots who don't do the regular instructing route.

But you are right - it is a minority group.
 
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