• This site moved from forums.flightinfo.com to flightinfo.com. Please update your bookmarks.

a new pilot needs advice

eriknorth

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Posts
148
Total Time
almost
Hey guys,
Well, I'm in a situation. I have been a music major in college for two years now. I have completely lost my drive for music, and I have realized that there is no professional future in it for me. I absolutely love flying, though. I want to be a pilot, but that would mean somehow financing a loan to fly and still go to school. Going to a flight college is out of the question, as I am limited to the college I go to for different reasons (I happen to love my college, though). So here's my problem: do I stay a music major (since I've already done two years, and I seem to have quite the talent for it) and get a music degree (which I don't plan on using for a music job), or do I change my major to something in which I am a bit more interested (i.e. that won't have me practicing three hours a day-thats like taking on a second college load of classes in itself) so I can have more time to fly and work to pay for it? I know I seem a bit emotional about the whole thing, but maybe some of you have been in a similar situation...please help me. What did all of you do in college? Thanks,
eriknorth
 

Wiggums

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
1,040
Total Time
.
If I were you I'd get the degree that I found most interesting. Don't worry how it will tie into aviation, any degree will be ok if you want to be a pilot.
 

mar

Remember this one?
Joined
Nov 27, 2001
Posts
1,929
Total Time
9500
Just get it behind you

In a perfect world I think an airline recruiter would prefer some sort of a scientific or technical degree--but I agree with Wiggums in the final analysis.

You really just need a four-year degree so that you can check that box.

I'm never the one to diminish the value of further education but let's be honest: The requirement for a degree is a relic from the past when most airline pilots came from the military where it was a requirement to become a commissioned officer (read: possess leadership qualities).

To a lesser degree, a college education shows that you're trainable.

What's most important will be your flying experience in the years leading up to the airline interview.

Most airlines like to see a steady progression through more complicated aircraft and the ability to upgrade (read: possess leadership qualities).

Do what you gotta do to get that degree outta the way as soon as you can and then you can concentrate on building the right kind of experience.

Best wishes.
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
Best degree

I got to where I am in a rather circuitous direction. I went to college as an accounting major, but from day one I was involved with my college radio station. I had decided that radio is what I really wanted to do in life but finished my accounting major because I figured the background might be useful in some way. Also, the arts and sciences majors required a foreign language and I was sick of foreign languages after struggling with them for five years in junior high and high school.

19 years in radio was enough and I had heard about this "pilot shortage," so I finished my ratings and changed careers to aviation. I figured that my accounting degree put a check mark in that box. I left aviation for the legal profession and finally used what I learned in college in my work. I did get interviews with five regionals, so, evidently, my degree cleared that hurdle.

Having provided that circuitous explanation, I'd say that you should finish your music degree. Although music may be a pain you have the talent for it, so maybe finishing college as a music major would be the path of least resistance to completing your degree. The debate about which major is best for aviation will never end, but everyone will agree that you need a four-year degree in something to get anywhere in this industry.

Hope that helps. Good luck with your flying.
 
Last edited:

ILLINI

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
495
Total Time
++++
Without a doubt, get your degree. What you get your degree in is up to you. Yes any degree will do for the majors, but think what will be best for you in the long run. My recommendation would be to get it in something that you can fall back on when the aviation industry enters one of its slow times (like now). Almost every professional pilot will go through a furlough at least once in his/her career. Some furloughes have lasted a few months, while others have lasted several years. Ask yourself this question: If, God forbid, something happened where you were unable to fly for a career (ie. loss of medical or lengthy furlough), would you be able to make a living outside of aviation using your degree? Could you make a living with a music degree? I may be way off here, but based on reading your post, it sounds like you already have an idea of what you want to do. If you are only two years into college it wouldn't be too difficult to change majors now. In the end, only you can decide what you will do. Just make sure to think it through and remember that the aviation industry is cyclical and will go through some very slow times.
 
Last edited:

English

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
3,374
Total Time
1
I also have a music degree, and have found that it is a conversation topic in interviews. Every interviewer I have encountered has asked questions about it and then shared stories about "friends" of theirs who are musicians, etc. It does not matter, in my personal experience, whether you have a music degree or technical degree. I have been offered every position I have ever interviewed for - that at least tells me that the music degree didn't hurt me. Plus, you already have two years invested. Is this a BA, BFA or an actual BM? If a BM, you are going to have to take alot more classes towards another degree - it will be faster to just finish the music degree if it is a BM. If a BA, probably a toss-up...
 

bobbysamd

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 26, 2001
Posts
5,710
Total Time
4565
A1FlyBoy

Roger. Go check your PMs.

Anyone else having problems with messages saying your mailboxes are full, even though they aren't?
 

jdog78

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 23, 2002
Posts
118
Total Time
2500+
Seems like you've been getting some good advice, but just to put in my two cents...
I just got out of college about a year ago. I graduated with two business degrees and I decided to pursue my real dream of aviation. I was also a professional musician (piano). I have a passion for music, but not the passion it takes to make it as a career musician. It sounds like you are at the crossroads i was at last year. My piano prof felt i had the talent to pursue a career but i knew that i didn't have the same passion for music as i do for flying, and i know that i would rather be a poor pilot on furlough than a poor pianist who can't find a gig.
So if flying is what you love, go for it no matter what the cost.

-j
 

TurboS7

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 25, 2001
Posts
2,261
Total Time
19,210
Music and airplanes like peanut butter a

Let me tell you something about music and airplanes. My wifes's family traveled all over the world as a music ministry family. The family played violins and my brother-in-law is no doubt about the best violinist in the world. For 7 years I flew the family around in a PA-31 all over the Lower48, Alaska, Canada, Central and South America. In the process my brother-in-law got his instrument, commercial, multi, and everything else. My wife Becky also got here private and accumulated a bunch of hours. I found both to be incrediable pilot's. Their ability to learn, multi-task, and instrument fly was well above anyone I have taught before. The only thing I can attirbute it to was the music, and the dicipline that the music taught. Both are the best and either could do very well as a professional pilot anywhere anytime, the basics came from the music. I would stick with the music major and get the degree, then push on from there, you will be heads and shoulders above the rest of the guys and girls. The exception would be one of my wife's violin students. She is 17 has her private and is building hours for an airline career, you'll fly with here out on the line one of these days, and she is excellent.
 

c172

Way to much fun
Joined
Dec 3, 2001
Posts
84
Total Time
noon
STAY IN SCHOOLL

DON'T BE A FOOL STAY IN SCHOOL IF I CAN DO IT OVER AGAIN I WHOULD 4 YEARS IS 4YEARS YOU CAN TAKE THAT ANYWEAR WANT:D :D :D :D :D :D
 
Top