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2 jump pilot jobs available

AWACoff

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Nov 27, 2001
Posts
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3000
Job #1- Green Bay Skydivers, Inc. Green Bay, WI
2 Cessna 182s (widebody)
"500TT min pending insurance carrier change." Prior cessna time a big plus.
Saturday and Sunday with some weeknights.
(920) 822-5010 ask for Greg or Dean

Job #2- Skydive Adventure Omro, WI
2 Cessna 182s (1 narrow body, 1 widebody)
250TT min with 182 time and more TT a big plus.
6 days a week.
(920) 685-5122 ask for Bill.

Dropzones are hurting for pilots right now. If you guys want jobs...stop whining about there being no hiring going on and go get them. I've recieved 3 phone calls in the last 2 days from different dropzones.
 
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flydog

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Nov 28, 2001
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542
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2500+
Do you have to resign your seniority?
 

bigD

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Jan 29, 2002
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I put my commercial certificate to use for the first time last weekend by flying a 182 for a drop zone. I had a blast! It was truely awesome. I'll have to do it some more this Summer.

Any low time guys looking for something to do - I'd recommend it highly!
 

AWACoff

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Flydog,
In a word, no. If a dropzone ever requests somebody to resign their seniority, I woud hope that somebody would laugh and laugh loud. These 2 dropzones I mentioned would welcome a furloughed pilot. Jumpers are trusting their life to you and feel more comfortable with higher time pilots for obvious reasons.
 

airnik

Active member
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Nov 26, 2001
Posts
42
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+1500
DZ's

I'm not sure about most of you, but for the guy just getting out of college and working on their CFI ratings, this would be a great opportunity. I did it for one summer season and never once got bored with it. The problem most folks get into with most DZ's is with insurance - not having enough time to meet the req'd times. But all in all it's a fun experience. What you get out of being a jump pilot is what you put into it - it's all about how your attitude is about it. There's always a way to make and keep it interesting. Have fun!!
 

Fr8Dog

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Dec 16, 2001
Posts
155
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2800
AWACoff did you quit flying there and just start jumping full time now? Whats going on over at AirWis these days? I see a 146 parked there with the United logo and the United Express on the side painted over. One of these days we will have to get together for lunch or something now that I am up here in ATW.
 

Xfr8dog

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Apr 1, 2002
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please explain how you get the door open enough on a 182 to get a body out of it. (ive never jumped before obviously) is it a plug door that you pull into the plane?
 

AWACoff

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On 182s, 180s, etc...the door is typically modified to hinge vertically. Then you simply open the door and the wind opens it up. Freightdog, I am still flying. We need at a minimum an additional pilot for the 2nd aircraft. If we got 2 more pilots that were doing the job because they needed the flight time, I'd just jump.
 

bigD

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Okay fellas, now that I'm a newly minted jump plane pilot - I have a question. After my first day, I was excited and told my girlfriend all about it. She asked me why I had to wear a parachute myself, and I explained about the possibility of a chute deploying early, wrapping around the tail, and taking me down with it.

Now, of course she's freaking about this kind of thing happening to me - chute on my back or not. I tried to explain to her that this kind of thing happens VERY infrequently, but in reality, I don't really know that it's the truth. And now I'm curious - how often does this kind of thing happen? I'm working again this coming Sunday, and I'd love to be able to put my girlfriend at ease about me flying jumpers. Any ideas? Or is it actually dangerous enough that I just shouldn't mention the inherent danger in it? ;)
 

skydiverdriver

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Well, it's probably not as dangerous as being a Nascar driver, but it's far more dangerous than flying around by yourself in an airplane.

I have heard a lot of stories, and I personally have had nothing happen. However, skydivers and DZ owners have a poor reputation for pilot pushing. If you EVER get asked to do something that would compromise safety, good sense or your integrity, just turn around and walk away. Believe me, it will be the best thing you ever did, no matter how difficult it was.

I thought about flying jumpers again during the strike, but I didn't want the liability. I also would prefer to leave it to low time guys who really need the work. Good luck to all..
 

Smoove Ride

Love Man
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Nov 27, 2001
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<enuff
be on the lookout....

as a jumper i can tell you i've seen d*mn near everything. folks grabbing other folks reserve handle on formation exit's. people almost hitting the tail (not on cessna's), pilot chute's going over the tail, etc.... it ain't pretty sometimes. get a group of people intent on getting out of an airplane mixed with adrenaline and stuff them in a really small space and sometimes things happen.
also, bring an extra key for the plane and keep it in your pocket. you'll know why when it happens.... have fun! -sr.
 

Jump Pilot

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Dec 31, 2001
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1200
Ah yes, the joy of flying jumpers.

Here are a few random thoughts:

Always have a hook knife within reach.

If you fly a 182, check the fuel selector valve after they get in, before takeoff, during climb, on jump run, and after they leave. It does have a tendency to get bumped.

Beware of sucker holes.

If your tandem customer is 200+, consider taking only three. Droppping the fourth jumper off the load won't hurt profits that bad.

Ask whoever is in the jumpmaster position to lean forward for take off. Also, put a little nose down trim in for take off.

You are PIC...exercise your responsiblity as such. They may think its sucks the first time you no-go a load, but they will get used to it.

Have fun. It's a blast!
 

AWACoff

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I do not have anybody lean forward during takeoff. I see no benefit to "moving the CG forward". Think about what will happen if you have to do a high speed abort or if you bag the engine immediately after takeoff. That person who is leaning forward and not belted in (which by itself is a problem) may have a good chance at joining the afterlife if you have a sudden stop (ie crash). Load the light guys in back, heavy guys in front. Just to appease your own curiosity, run the W+B for both situations. For more tips and tricks on flying jumpers in 182s, go to www.diverdriver.com. The moderator of the site has some good info (as well as being a current jump pilot and RJ capt. at Air Willy).
 

Jump Pilot

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O.K. it moved the CG forward .8 inches. Maybe not significant enough.

However, depending on the loading situation with a tandem you can't always load the light in the back and the heavy up front. The heaviest guy in the ship (tandem master) can't ride in the front because he won't fit with his rig.
 

stardog

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Mar 25, 2002
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"Jumpers are trusting their life to you and feel more comfortable with higher time pilots for obvious reasons."

Heh, that must be why they are ALL wearing PARACHUTES! ;)
 
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