Is there "safety sense" technology for airplanes?

guy_liking_pretty_planes

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Toyota has this for cars and trucks to try to avoid wrecks. Radars, backup cameras and stuff.

One real possibility is that a pilot might forget to lower his landing gear as he is about to land. What kind of technology could warn a crew about to land with UP landing gear? How about if the aircraft gets within 1,000 above the ground or something? Absolute altitude check? How about if the plane is approaching within five miles of the runway? If the flight is on autonav/GPS, the avionics should know that there is a landing due to come up and then can check the position of the gear and warn the cockpit if the gear is up. I would like to know well enough in advance if my gear is up or even DOWN and locked before I get anywhere near the runway to touch down. If the gear fails mechanically, I want to know that well enough ahead of time.

Safety Sense is intuitive technology. We are only human. The stall shaker is a form of safety sense technology.

Either get WARNED of upcoming danger early or get WARMED, very WARM, when it's too late!

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belchfire

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Where in the flying frack do you think Toyota, Mercedes, BMW, Nissan, GM et. al. got the idea?

Gear warning systems have been around for many decades-I've never flown an airplane that didn't have some sort of gear warning system and one of the retractable gear machines that I had the pleasure of flying was a barely post WWII Bellanca-a predecessor to the Cruisemaster, that airplane was an absolute joy to fly. It had some kind of red light or buzzer that went off if the gear were up at low airspeed and reduced power settings.

Through time various warning systems have become ever more comprehensive and while not required many light aircraft (light aircraft do not have the surplus lift capacity and in some cases the electrical power to deal with more comprehensive systems) and even commercial turboprops down to 19 seats and perhaps even smaller now have a system called Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System...look it up, some of the capabilities in the more sophisticated versions are amazing.

That Aeroflot pos in your picture has the nose gear down so the crew had made the proper gear position selection. I don't know what happened to the main gear, if they failed up, failed to lock down or collapsed due to a hard landing but they would have gotten some kind of loud and obnoxious warning at some point regardless!

Ah, here it is...


A heavy weight landing poorly executed resulting in collapse of the main gear...

 
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