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Best IFR textbook?

UpNDownGuy

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Hi-

I am going to be giving my brother ground school for an instrument rating. Can anyone suggest the best textbook to teach from? I am looking for something fairly modern, so things like GPS will be included.

Thanks for any suggestions.
 

Abernathy

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When I was an active CFI, I taught IR candidates primarily from the FAA Instrument Flying Handbook and the AIM. The Jeppessen IFR book (don't remember the name) is also good, but has a tendency to distract far too much with pictures of airliners and sidenotes.

I'd recommend going that way. The AIM is rich with info and visual aids that most people overlook.
 

J.Otto

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I second the above. Jepp books are great. The FAA Instrument handbooks too. AIM/FAR and hes all set. Oh and a PTS too. These four things are all you really need.
 

JAFI

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If you want him to just pass the written, give him the Gleim test guide and have him study it. If you want him to learn the material, +1 on the above and I recommend the Kershner Instrument handbook from Iowa press. The GPS would best be a side area and learning the concept is easy, learning how to use GPS from a book is like learning lovemaking from a book. You really need to get your hands on a GPS unit to LEARN how to use it.
 

Jack Campbell

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I highly recommend "Instrument Pilot Flight Training Manual" by Ralph A. Butcher. I used it for my IFR training 17 years ago, so I don't know if it's been updated for use in modern cockpits. This is, by far, the best book I've read on safely managing IFR flight. You may need to use this in addition to other more modern books, but it is the best for what it talks about.
 

wrxpilot

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FAA Instrument Flying Handbook (it's been recently updated), FAR/AIM, and Ron Machado's "Instrument Pilot's Survival Manual". Rod's book does a REALLY nice job of putting it all together, and goes in depth into the Jepp/NACO charts and plates. Also, there's a great section on GPS, WX RAdar, and T-storm avoidance. I still reference the book sometimes.
 

jak378

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Count this as a second vote for Kershner. In over 40 years of instructing I never found anything better for all levels.
 

Amish RakeFight

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FAA Instrument Flying Handbook (it's been recently updated), FAR/AIM, and Ron Machado's "Instrument Pilot's Survival Manual". Rod's book does a REALLY nice job of putting it all together, and goes in depth into the Jepp/NACO charts and plates. Also, there's a great section on GPS, WX RAdar, and T-storm avoidance. I still reference the book sometimes.

Rod Machado is a cornball...
 

UpNDownGuy

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Thanks for all the great replies. This is probably a seriously stupid question, but where would I find a copy of the FAA Instrument Flying Handbook? This seems to be the consensus favorite. I've never seen one in an FBO.

Of course, I will also teach from the AIM and the FARS...
 

Amish RakeFight

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I agree. Still authored a very fine textbook though.


His material is certainly good, I just have trouble getting past his cornballery.


Aside from textbooks, perhaps incorporate some DVDs from Sporty's. Some of Richard Collins IFR videos are pretty good for learning purposes at any stage.
 

Big Dog

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The FAA's Instrument Procedures Handbook, recently updated. It fills in the holes with great "why" info. A good source for experienced pilots. Different from the FAA's Instrument Flying Handbook
 

skyaddict

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My only beef with the FAA's material is that it weighs in so heavily towards the "primary-supporting" method rather than the "control-performance" method of basic attitude flying, which I personally feel is teaching an emergency technique as the primary way of flying light GA IFR, but that's a whole 'nother thread. However, at least the FAA matarial now does include the c/p method, even if it's given relatively short shrift.
 
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