People actually do this???!!!

crash-proof

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UnAnswerd said:
.....................

I'm afraid so...I admit I like to do it sometimes myself. :eek:
 

DC4boy

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Yep, people do that every single day, 12 hrs a day.....


Hard to belive theres flying outside of the airlines, huh?......
 

low-n-slow

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GravityHater said:
Did he go through some guy wires??

No, most all tower guy wires are triangled and typically never cross a roadway, from which he approached. He probably dropped down between two of the three sets of these wires and into the field, looks as though he was too far away from the tower on his approach to go through the wires anyway. Part of the job.

I've never tried to go under a tower guy wire but I have flown between two sets of wires where a huge cross country powerline had another smaller powerline below...my eyes were much better back then though. ;)
 

Geronimo4497

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T-REX said:
http://www.airviolence.com/e107_files/downloads/Crash%20&Accidents/cheyenne.mov


Never seen this one of a guy taking off in a skylane in a Thunderstorm. Anyone know where to find it in something besides a .mov file?

I believe that this was that media stunt by some seven or eight year old kid (more likely her father, who was in the back seat and also killed) that was trying to "pilot" an airplane across the country. The instructor let the pressure and fame go to his head. It is accidents like these that cause the public to have am unjustified fear of flying. Stupid, stupid, stupid.
 

low-n-slow

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DC4boy said:
Hard to belive theres flying outside of the airlines, huh?......


LOL, wish I had a dollar for everytime I've said or thought this.
 
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ISaidRightTurns

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NTSB Report Brief

Accident InformationAccident Date:Thursday, 1996 Apr 11, 08:24 MDTNTSB ID:SEA96MA079Accident/Incident:AccidentAccident Location:CHEYENNE, WyomingAircraft N-Number:N35207Aircraft InformationAircraft Make/Model:Cessna 177BMaintenance Type:Last Inspection Type: Annual, 1995 Jul 08Airframe Total Time:3582 hoursEngine Make/Model:Lycoming O-360-A1F6DNumber of Engines:1Rules Flight conducted under:14 CFR 91Operation:PersonalLocation InformationDeparture Point:CYS, Same as Accident SiteDeparture Time:08:22 MDTDestination:LNK, LINCOLN, NBAccident Location:Off airport/airstripDirection to Airport:322° / 1 milesAirport:CYS, CHEYENNEAirport Elevation:6156 feetRunway:30; 6691 feet x 150 feet; Asphalt, WetWeather InformationBasic Weather Conditions:Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), DaylightLowest Clouds:Scattered, 1600 feetLowest Ceiling:Broken, 2400 feetObserved Visibility:5 milesTemperature:40°F, Dew Point: 32°FWind:240° / 20 kts, Gusts 28 ktsDensity Altitude:6670 feetVisibility Restrictions:No visibility restrictionsPrecipitation:Rain (R), LightWeather Information Source:Weather observation facilityPilot InformationPilot:52 years old, malePilot Certificates and Ratings:Commercial, Flight instructor, Single engine land, No other ratingsInstrument Ratings:AirplaneFlight Instructor Ratings:Airplane SEMedical Certificate:Class 2Medical Certificate Valid:Valid medical-with waivers/limitationsDate of Last Medical Certificate:1995 May 24Current BFR:YesSource of Flight Time:Pilot log, Investigator's estimatePilot TimeAll Aircraft/Make+ModelTotal Time:1484 hours / Unknown/Not reported hoursInstrument Time:381 hoursLast 90 Days:55 hours / 13 hoursLast 24 Hours:8 hours / 8 hoursAccident InformationWeather Briefing Source:Flight service stationWeather Briefing Method:TelephoneWeather Briefing Comment:FullType of Clearance:Special VFRVFR Approach/Landing Type:No approach/landingIFR Approach:No IFR approachAirspace at Accident Location:Class DAircraft:Damage: Destroyed, Fire: No fire, Explosion: No explosionInjuries (Fatal/Serious/Minor/None)Highest Degree of Injury:FatalPilot:1 / 0 / 0 / 0Passengers:2 / 0 / 0 / 0
Accident Narrative:


ather (a passenger) and the pilot-in-command (PIC), were engaged in a trans-continental record attempt involving 6,660 miles of flying in 8 consecutive days. The 1st leg of the trip (about 8 hours of flying) had been accomplished the previous day and began/ended with considerable media attention. On the morning of the 2nd day, the PIC and the trainee participated in media interviews, pre-flighted, and then loaded the airplane. The PIC then received a weather briefing and was advised of moderate icing conditions, turbulence, IFR flight precautions, and a cold front in the area of the departure airport. The airplane was taxied in rain to takeoff on runway 30. While taxiing, the PIC acknowledged receiving information that the wind was from 280 degrees at 20 gusting 30 knots and that a departing Cessna 414 pilot reported moderate low-level windshear of +/- 15 knots. The airplane then departed on runway 30 towards a nearby thunderstorm and began a gradual turn to an easterly heading. Witnesses described the airplane's climb rate and speed as slow, and they observed the airplane enter a roll and descent that was consistent with a stall. Density altitude at the airport was 6,670 feet. The airplane's gross weight was calculated to be 84 pounds over the maximum limit at the time of the impact. (See: NTSB/AAR-97/02 for detailed info) Occurence #1:Loss of control - in flightPhase of Operation:Takeoff - initial climbFindings 1:Planning/decision - Improper - Pilot in command (Cause)Findings 2:Pressure induced by conditions/events - Pilot in command (Factor)Findings 3:Aircraft weight and balance - Exceeded - Pilot in command (Factor)Findings 4:Weather condition - Turbulence(thunderstorms) (Factor)Findings 5:Weather condition - Gusts (Factor)Findings 6:Weather condition - Rain (Factor)Findings 7:Weather condition - High density altitude (Factor)Findings 8:Airspeed - Inadequate - Pilot in command (Cause)Findings 9:Stall - Inadvertent - Pilot in command (Cause)Occurence #2:In flight collision with terrain/waterPhase of Operation:Descent - uncontrolledAccident Cause:
The pilot-in-command's improper decision to take off into deteriorating weather conditions (including turbulence, gusty winds, and an advancing thunderstorm and associated precipitation) when the airplane was overweight and when the density altitude was higher than he was accustomed to, resulting in a stall caused by failure to maintain airspeed. Contributing to the pilot-in-command's decision to take off was a desire to adhere to an overly ambitious itinerary, in part, because of media commitments.

 
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